Press release
July 24, 2012

Contacts

Mahaut Tyrrell
Media relations officer
Cultural development and communication
01 40 08 80 24 

Vincent Charpentier
Director of media relations and partnerships
Cultural development and communication, Inrap, 01 40 08 80 16 

Cécile Martinez
Cultural development and communication
Inrap, direction interrégionale Méditerranée
06 87 01 62 86 

A Roman shipwreck in the Antique port of Antibes

On line since August 30, 2012 · Updated August 30, 2012
A team of Inrap archaeologists is currently excavating part of the Antique port of Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes). This research, curated by the State (Drac Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur), is being conducted in advance of the construction of an underground parking lot by QPark. The archaeologists will work for seven months at the site of "Pré aux Pêcheurs”.
Zoom:The Antique Antipolis…
L’épave romaine dans le port antique d’Antibes

The Antique Antipolis…

Antibes is the Antique Antipolis, a Greek trading post founded by the Phocaeans of Massalia. The date of its establishment is still uncertain, but it followed an indigenous habitat located in the high areas of the current city. Along the Provençal shoreline, Antipolis occupied an advantageous location on the maritime routes linking Marseille to the Italian coast. Like the Saint-Roch cove, it had a natural port that was protected from the dominant winds. The prosperity of the Greek and then Roman city was largely based on the dynamic activity of its maritime commerce, as well as on the transformation of sea products, fish salting and the fabrication of garum (a fish based sauce).

… and its port

The archaeologists are currently exploring, over 5000 m2, the bottom of an Antique port basin, which was progressively covered with sand. This obvious waste dump has yielded many objects – waste thrown from mooring boats or bits of cargo lost during transshipments – and provides information on the daily activities of the sailors and the maritime commerce. The layers of archaeological objects have been accumulating since the 3rd century BC until the 6th century AD. Several tens of thousands of objects of all kinds that were sunken underwater in the Saint-Roch cove have already been recovered, including merchandise originating from periphery of the Mediterranean basin. They alone illustrate the dynamic nature of the Antique port and commerce in this part of the Mediterranean.
The sediments excavated were located under the sea level and were not dried until the construction of the parking lot. These specific anaerobic conditions contributed to the preservation of organic materials and thus allowed the recovery of objects that are not preserved in excavations on land, including amphora corks, leather shoe soles and wood objects.

The shipwreck

In the last area explored by the Inrap archaeologists, the wreck of a Roman vessel was discovered. The boat, preserved over more than 15 m in length, is lying on its side in a shallow area (less than 1.6 m under the Antique sea level). In the context of a partnership with the Centre Camille Jullian, Inrap and a CNRS naval archaeology specialist are collaborating in the analysis and interpretation of this discovery.
The remains consist of a keel and several boards that covered the hull, held together by thousands of pegs inserted into sheave slots cut into the thickness of the boards. Around forty transverse ribs are present, some of which were attached to the keel with metallic pins.
Elements of the ceiling were also identified. The keelson, which served to house the foot of the mast, was not preserved. This vessel was a medium-sized commercial sailboat (20/22 m long, 6/7 m wide, height of the hold approximately 3 m). Conifer was the main wood used in its construction. The wood knots of the hull were reinforced by plaques of lead held in place by small nails. These plaques compensated for the faults of a medium quality wood, which was used for the construction of this vessel because is was easily available and accessible. The tool traces are clearly visible (saw and adze), as is the pitch that was used to protect the hull. These architectural features support the date indicated by the stratigraphy and pottery elements recovered in the levels accumulated after the boat was abandoned – the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD – and allow the vessel to be attributed to the Imperial Roman ships of the western Mediterranean.

The cause of its sinking is still unknown. Did it crash against the shore during a storm? Was it abandoned to rot in a corner of the port? Was it purposefully sunk to serve as a base for a wharf? These two latter hypotheses could explain the absence of cargo. The continuing investigations will surely reveal the answer.

Developer

QPark Serimo

Curation

Service régional de l’archéologie (Drac Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur)

Site director

Isabelle Daveau, Inrap

Naval archaeology

Giulia Boetto, Centre Camille Jullian, CNRS

Photos album

  • Navire romain en cours de démontage à Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.En vue de sa restauration, le bateau a été démonté pièce par pièce avec ARC-Nucléart.
    Navire romain en cours de démontage à Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    En vue de sa restauration, le bateau a été démonté pièce par pièce avec ARC-Nucléart.
    © Rémi Bénali, Inrap
  • L'emprise du parking souterrain du Pré aux Pêcheurs couvre 5000 m2 en bordure du port de plaisance actuel d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes). La fouille a démarré en mars 2012 à l'extrémité orientale du parking.
    L'emprise du parking souterrain du Pré aux Pêcheurs couvre 5000 m2 en bordure du port de plaisance actuel d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes). 
    La fouille a démarré en mars 2012 à l'extrémité orientale du parking.
    © Rémi Bénali, Inrap
  • Dégagement d'un niveau de dépotoir au fond du port antique, Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.Le fond du bassin portuaire antique, qui s'est progressivement ensablé, a révélé des dizaines de milliers d'objets qui se répartissent dans des couches stratigraphiques datées entre le IIIe s. avant notre ère et le VIe s. de notre ère.
    Dégagement d'un niveau de dépotoir au fond du port antique, Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    Le fond du bassin portuaire antique, qui s'est progressivement ensablé, a révélé des dizaines de milliers d'objets qui se répartissent dans des couches stratigraphiques datées entre le IIIe s. avant notre ère et le VIe s. de notre ère.
    © Rémi Bénali, Inrap
  • Fouille d'un niveau de dépotoir au fond du port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.Des milliers d'objets, déchets rejetés depuis les bateaux au mouillage ou pièces de cargaison perdues lors de transbordements, ont pu être exhumés.
    Fouille d'un niveau de dépotoir au fond du port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    Des milliers d'objets, déchets rejetés depuis les bateaux au mouillage ou pièces de cargaison perdues lors de transbordements, ont pu être exhumés.
    © Rémi Bénali, Inrap
  • Vue d'un niveau de dépotoir du IVe s. de notre ère, port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.Ces objets coulés dans les eaux de l'anse Saint-Roch illustrent le dynamisme du commerce maritime en Méditerranée occidentale.
    Vue d'un niveau de dépotoir du IVe s. de notre ère, port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    Ces objets coulés dans les eaux de l'anse Saint-Roch illustrent le dynamisme du commerce maritime en Méditerranée occidentale.
    © Rémi Bénali, Inrap
  • Niveau de dépotoir avec au premier plan une amphore, port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.Des milliers d'objets en provenance du pourtour méditerranéen ont d'ores-et-déjà été mis au jour. La prospérité de la cité grecque puis romaine d'Antibes repose en partie sur la transformation des produits de la mer et leur commercialisation.
    Niveau de dépotoir avec au premier plan une amphore, port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    Des milliers d'objets en provenance du pourtour méditerranéen ont d'ores-et-déjà été mis au jour. La prospérité de la cité grecque puis romaine d'Antibes repose en partie sur la transformation des produits de la mer et leur commercialisation.
    © Rémi Bénali, Inrap
  • Vue de détail d'une amphore émergeant d'un niveau de dépotoir, port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    Vue de détail d'une amphore émergeant d'un niveau de dépotoir, port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    © Rémi Bénali, Inrap
  • Station de lavage du matériel exhumé lors de la fouille du port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    Station de lavage du matériel exhumé lors de la fouille du port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    © Rémi Bénali, Inrap
  • Lampe à huile en cours de nettoyage, port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    Lampe à huile en cours de nettoyage, port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    © Rémi Bénali, Inrap
  • Deux amphorisques (à gauche) et des fragments de céramique sigillée retrouvés dans des niveaux de dépotoir du port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.Des quantités hors normes de mobilier archéologique ont été exhumées.
    Deux amphorisques (à gauche) et des fragments de céramique sigillée retrouvés dans des niveaux de dépotoir du port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    Des quantités hors normes de mobilier archéologique ont été exhumées.
    © Rémi Bénali, Inrap
  • Lavage de céramique, port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    Lavage de céramique, port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    © Rémi Bénali, Inrap
  • Trois amphorisques (récipients de petites dimensions en forme d'amphore contenant des parfums ou des onguents), port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    Trois amphorisques (récipients de petites dimensions en forme d'amphore contenant des parfums ou des onguents), port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    © Rémi Bénali, Inrap
  • Premier sondage d'exploration sur l'épave romaine, port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    Premier sondage d'exploration sur l'épave romaine, port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    © Rémi Bénali, Inrap
  • Débat autour du premier sondage d'exploration de l'épave romaine, port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.On peut apercevoir au premier plan des broches métalliques reliant les membrures à la quille.
    Débat autour du premier sondage d'exploration de l'épave romaine, port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    On peut apercevoir au premier plan des broches métalliques reliant les membrures à la quille.
    © Rémi Bénali, Inrap
  • Relevé au scanner 3D de l'épave romaine par la société Sintégra, port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.Conservé sur plus de 15 m de long, le bateau a été retrouvé couché sur le flanc à un endroit peu profond, situé à moins de 1,60 m sous le niveau marin antique.
    Relevé au scanner 3D de l'épave romaine par la société Sintégra, port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    Conservé sur plus de 15 m de long, le bateau a été retrouvé couché sur le flanc à un endroit peu profond, situé à moins de 1,60 m sous le niveau marin antique.
    © Rémi Bénali, Inrap
  • L'épave romaine totalement dégagée, port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.Il s'agit d'un voilier de commerce de taille moyenne (longueur de 20 à 22 m, largeur de 6 à 7 m, hauteur de cale de 3 m) d'époque impériale. Aucune trace d'un chargement n'a été détectée : le bateau a pu être abandonné ou a été coulé volontairement pour servir de base à un appontement.
    L'épave romaine totalement dégagée, port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    Il s'agit d'un voilier de commerce de taille moyenne (longueur de 20 à 22 m, largeur de 6 à 7 m, hauteur de cale de 3 m) d'époque impériale. Aucune trace d'un chargement n'a été détectée : le bateau a pu être abandonné ou a été coulé volontairement pour servir de base à un appontement.
    © Rémi Bénali, Inrap
  • Nettoyage de l'épave romaine mise au jour dans le port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes) en 2012.Le bois utilisé dans la construction du navire est de qualité moyenne : la coque est par endroits renforcée par des plaquettes de plomb maintenues par de petits clous.
    Nettoyage de l'épave romaine mise au jour dans le port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes) en 2012.
    Le bois utilisé dans la construction du navire est de qualité moyenne : la coque est par endroits renforcée par des plaquettes de plomb maintenues par de petits clous.
    © Rémi Bénali, Inrap
  • Eclairage nocturne pour la photogrammétrie, épave romaine mise au jour dans le port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    Eclairage nocturne pour la photogrammétrie, épave romaine mise au jour dans le port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    © Rémi Bénali, Inrap
  • Arrosage nocturne du bateau, port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.Les bois archéologiques, gorgés d'eau, doivent être arrosés régulièrement pour être préservés. Ensuite, ils seront traités en laboratoire où l'eau sera progressivement remplacée par une résine de consolidation.
    Arrosage nocturne du bateau, port antique d'Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), 2012.
    Les bois archéologiques, gorgés d'eau, doivent être arrosés régulièrement pour être préservés. Ensuite, ils seront traités en laboratoire où l'eau sera progressivement remplacée par une résine de consolidation.
    © Rémi Bénali, Inrap