The contemporary period extends from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the present day. Many historians place its beginning in 1789 or at the Congress of Vienna in 1815), which marks the end of the Napoleonic period. In Europe, these two centuries are characterized by phenomena and events of an unprecedented magnitude: demographic growth, industrialization and productivism, political revolutions, globalization of crises, colonialist extensions and collapses, nationalisms, wars, etc., along with the extension of democracy, totalitarian episodes, mass education, the decline of Christianity, agriculture, progress in medicine, etc.

Short film

In an original narrative mode, illustrated with numerous archive images, Christian Rist and Jean-Paul Fargier tell us the history of archeology,...

Press reviews
Colloquia

An international symposium organised by the National Institute of Preventive Archaeological Research and the Louvre-Lens Museum.

2, 3...

Discoveries

The discovery of an surprising concentration of graffiti and inscriptions made by soldiers during the First World War reoriented the investigation...

Discoveries

An Inrap team has recently excavated a German military cemetery from the First World War. This research was conducted in advance of the...

Events

From 1914 to 1918, 10 million soldiers died on the battleground.

Discoveries

The film “Joyeux Noël” by Christian Carion recounted the truces between soldiers during the First World War, episodes of “fraternization”...

Press reviews

Honoured, mythified, but also hunted, eaten and exploited, has the horse really benefited from a privileged status among domestic animals? What...

Conference

The archaeology of violence: wartime violence, mass violence
by Xavier Dectot, Director of the Louvre-Lens Museum, and Dominique...

Conference

The archaeology of violence: wartime violence, mass violence 
by Jean Guilaine, member of Institute

Conference

The archaeology of violence: wartime violence, mass violence  
by Jacques Sémelin, CERI-Sciences Po, (CNRS)

Conference

The archaeology of violence: wartime violence, mass violence 
by Christopher Browning, university North Carolina

Conference

The archaeology of violence: wartime violence, mass violence 
by Gabriel Moshenska, university College of London.

Discoveries

A team of Inrap archaeologists is currently excavating artefacts from the First World War near Reims. Covering 4.5 hectares, this Inrap...

Conference

The archaeology of violence: wartime violence, mass violence 
by Douglas D. Scott, University of Nebraska

Conference

The archaeology of violence: wartime violence, mass violence 
by Michel Signoli, ADES AMU-EFS-CNRS, Marseille

Conference

The archaeology of violence: wartime violence, mass violence 

Chair : David El Kenz, university of...

Conference

The archaeology of violence: wartime violence, mass violence 
by Elodie Cabot, Inrap

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